100 years of architectural education at KU

The excellence of the KU Architecture Program and its students and alumni derives, in large measure, from the excellence of its faculty. Since Goldwin Goldsmith started building a program and a faculty a hundred years ago, this faculty has been characterized by a living connection to the most important and respected intellectual trends and movements in architectural education, by a cosmopolitanism that includes professional experiences in architecturally important centers of activity, by personal contacts and experiences with some of the leading and legendary members of the field, by a diversity of training and experience that is international in scope and attitude, by an affinity for rational and scientific approaches to architectural design and an openness to experimentation, and finally, by an aesthetic sensibility that is at once historically cultivated and socially humane. In this next decade that will lead to our Centennial in 2013, we share a unique and remarkable heritage—the historical momentum of excellence in architectural education.

 


Calendar & Events
Tonight the MoCoLab will be at the Kansas City Center for Architecture & Design, 1810 McGee, Kansas City, Mo. from 5:00 to 11:00 pm. It's part of Kansas City Design Week Celebration. The MoCoLab will display an exhibit of KU Department of Architecture student work with a special emphasis on public interest design. More KU student work will be displayed at the Kansas City Design Center, 1020 Baltimore. The MoCoLab (short for "mobile collaboratory") is an Airstream trailer that was restored, and made into a mobile community center by students enrolled in Assoc. Professor Nils Gore's Studio 409 class last spring and summer.

Andrea Freear : "always a bit of sex in @RuralStudio projects." At # (re)engagedarchitecture symposium http://t.co/Rmk6ScE580
Lauded race and class historian becomes KU Foundation Professor David Roediger’s award-winning research and writing has already transformed how historians view the growth of social freedoms in America though the intersection of race, class, ethnicity, and labor. Now Roediger, as KU’s first Foundation Distinguished Professor of History (http://bit.ly/1AbAqYw), will continue to break new ground in those fields as he leads KU’s departments of American Studies and History. Roediger likes to study historical flash points — where one particular change brings a cascade of wider cultural changes. His latest book, “Seizing Freedom, Slave Emancipation and Liberty for All,” makes the point that as slaves began freeing themselves across the South during the Civil War, their emancipation inspired and ignited other cultural movements for freedom — such as the women’s movement for suffrage and the labor movement for better working conditions and an eight-hour day. Understanding the individual stories of average people who wanted to make their lives better, including slaves or factory workers, is important to understanding the wider political movements and elections, Roediger said. “It's tempting to think that all the important political questions have been decided,” he said, “but actually people are constantly thinking about what freedom would mean for them.”


One of 34 U.S. public institutions in the prestigious Association of American Universities
26 prestigious Rhodes Scholars — more than all other Kansas colleges combined
Nearly $290 million in financial aid annually
46 nationally ranked graduate programs.
—U.S. News & World Report
Top 50 nationwide for size of library collection.
—ALA
23rd nationwide for service to veterans —"Best for Vets," Military Times