Nils Gore

School of Architecture, Design & Planning - Architecture
Associate Professor
Primary office:
Marvin Hall
Room 312
University of Kansas
1465 Jayhawk Boulevard
Lawrence, KS 66045


Nils Gore is an associate professor at the University of Kansas and a licensed architect. His PID work consists of a number of student design/build projects in Mississippi, Kansas and New Orleans, where he and his students worked with the Porch Cultural Organization following Hurricane Katrina. The work has won design awards from the AIA, AIAS and the ACSA. The work has been published in the Journal of Architectural Education, Batture: Amnesiascope, Cityscape: a Journal of Policy Development and Research and has been presented in numerous scholarly presentations. Nils is a graduate of Kansas State University and the Harvard Graduate School of Design and has taught at the Boston Architectural Center, Mississippi State University and the University of Kansas.

Teaching

Classroom Teaching

I am a proponent of experiential learning, and as an engaged scholar have pursued an academic path where the classes I teach—particularly the design studio—have placed students in contexts outside of the typical classroom setting, and working in communities on “real” projects. In these studios, I am a proponent of design/construct projects in the public interest, at a range of scales. The important thing is for students to develop design intentions out of the act of making something, so that the design is responsive to the situation. In my typical studio project, they learn about the nature of materials by working with real materials. They learn that it is not easy to translate an ambiguous personal vision into a built reality. Direct experience of the Real in (seemingly) simple projects fosters a fertile environment for learning complex and numerous lessons: aesthetic lessons, technical lessons, collaboration lessons, labor lessons, economic lessons, social lessons, and psychological lessons.

I see my role as a teacher as less one of me teaching them, and more of me setting up situations, through community engagement, whereby they can learn. And the most effective way I have found for students to learn is by doing. Doing promotes complex thinking about the situation at hand, and engages the whole body/mind in the experience. The action required to do a task embeds the knowledge in one’s body/mind in a meaningful way. As John Dewey states: The sole direct path to enduring improvement in the methods of instruction and learning consists in centering upon the conditions which exact, promote, and test thinking. Thinking is the method of intelligent learning, learning that employs and rewards mind….And where (students) are engaged in doing things, and in discussing what arises in the course of their doing, it is found, even with comparatively indifferent modes of instruction, that (students’) inquiries are spontaneous and numerous, and the proposals of solution advanced, varied, and ingenious. (Thinking in Education, Chapter 12).

My community engaged scholarship—as described by Boyer—has resulted in numerous community-based constructed projects, most of which are externally funded. Several of these have received peer-reviewed recognition in the form of design awards, have been presented and discussed in scholarly presentations, and the lessons learned have been disseminated in peer-reviewed journals. From a learning point of view, the students involved in these projects have received an enhanced educational experience that will make them better architects—and citizens—in the long run.1 The people we have engaged in communities have benefitted from our participation, and have gained a greater understanding and appreciation of their own communities. The University of Kansas has benefitted as well, in the sense of expanding its own mission in communities and its evolving role as an institution of higher learning.2

Undergraduate Student Advising

In most cases, Undergraduate advising in my department happens fairly informally, in the sense that we get to know our students very well, in the context of the design studio. With twelve hours of contact a week, and a classroom environment that is about exchanging ideas, advising happens conversationally on a one-to-one basis, in small groups, or to the class as a whole. As a studio teacher I acquire a pretty good sense of my students’ skills, interests and capacities and are able to advise them both in a larger career sense, and, at particular moments in the year, when they are pre-registering for classes, in a specific sense as to what classes they might take to fulfill curriculum requirements.

Graduate Student Advising and Mentoring

I have served on three PhD committees since I’ve been at KU, and will continue to mentor and support students in the context of the community-based work we are doing through Dotte Agency in Wyandotte County. Though I’m not on his committee, currently I work very closely with Matt Kleinmann (PhD student) in this work, and again, as with undergraduates students, am able to provide advice and mentoring informally. As the work of Dotte Agency proceeds, I’d like to develop a pattern of securing external finding to work with students in the public health/built environment context.

1. Peters, S. J. (2004). “Educating the Civic Professional: Reconfigurations and Resistances.” Michigan Journal of Community Service Learning, 11(1), 47-58. and Colby, A., Beaumont, E., Ehrlich, T., & Corngold, J. (2010). Educating for democracy: Preparing undergraduates for responsible political engagement (Vol. 19).

2. 7. Stanton, T. K. (2012). New times demand new scholarship II: Research universities and civic engagement: Opportunities and challenges. Journal of Higher Education Outreach and Engagement, 16(4), 271-304

Teaching Interests

  • Materials, tectonics, design/build, prototyping, community design, engaged scholarship

Research

Focus of the Program

In 1990 Ernest Boyer and the Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching published Scholarship Reconsidered: Priorities of the Professoriate to “end the suffocating practice in which colleges and universities measure themselves far too frequently by external status rather than by values determined by their own distinctive mission.” 1 In his report Boyer acknowledges that, over time, research has come to mean knowledge that gets discovered in the academy within a positivist epistemological framework and then disseminated to users in a one-way flow of information, with little regard as to how the end-user accepts and applies that information.2 At the same time, the other functions of the university—teaching and service—are segregated in their boxes and assessed by other measures of value. Scholarship Reconsidered calls for a reconsideration of these activities to promote an enriched vision of academic life, in a constructivist epistemological worldview: “Theory surely leads to practice. But practice also leads to theory. And teaching, at its best, shapes both research and practice. Viewed from this perspective, a more comprehensive, more dynamic understanding of scholarship can be considered, one in which the rigid categories of teaching, research, and service are broadened and more flexibly defined....(T)he work of the scholar also means stepping back from one’s investigation, looking for connections, building bridges between theory and practice, and communicating one’s knowledge effectively to students.” Boyer reconceives scholarship in four broad areas: the scholarship of discovery, the scholarship of teaching, the scholarship of integration, and the scholarship of application.

My work touches on all four of Boyer’s categories, but the last—the scholarship of application—is probably most apt. “The scholarship of application, as we define it here, is not a one way street. Indeed, the term itself may be misleading if it suggests that knowledge is first “discovered” and then “applied. The process we have in mind is far more dynamic. New intellectual understandings can arise out of the very act of application--whether in medical diagnosis, serving clients in psychotherapy, shaping public policy, creating an architectural design, or working with the public schools. In activities such as these, theory and practice vitally interact, and one renews the other.”4 In the years since, Boyer’s “scholarship of application” has come to be known as engagement, and “describes the collaboration ‘between higher education institutions and their larger communities (local, regional/state, national, global) for the mutually beneficial exchange of knowledge and resources in a context of partnership and reciprocity.’”5 The idea of reciprocity is the key to understanding how my work fits into the rubric of engaged scholarship.

My professional discipline is a project-based discipline wherein design problems come to the architect, are sized-up through research and analysis, and then “solved,” in the sense that some design response occurs to address the initial problem. The success of the solution lies in how well it answers to the initial problem statement. At a strictly utilitarian level, this is a relatively easy thing to do. People, after all, have been designing and building shelter for millennia—in the interest of keeping warm, dry and safe. But as the critique of one’s success moves beyond mere shelter, things become murkier, more difficult to assess. Does the project meet larger social, political, cultural or artistic goals? Does it enhance or detract from its urban/rural context? Does the natural environment suffer or benefit from it? Are people happy and healthy in it? Does it contribute to the economic well-being of its inhabitants? Is it replicable?

To answer these questions one must look beyond the goals of the architect and consider the larger context. Architectural projects don’t happen in a vacuum. They happen in response to the needs of a client and a community and are formed through that partnership. The community-based design/build projects that form the basis of my work are positive exemplars of reciprocity in action. New Orleans, for instance, as a cultural environment, is a rich stew of influences that necessarily affect the outcome of the work there. When my students and I travelled there to meet the people and immerse ourselves in the realities of the place, we responded with a “solution” that was absolutely driven by those influences. Just a few months after hurricane Katrina, we sat in a stark room in a damaged church and shared stories with neighbors who just survived the tragedy of the storm, and we were all transformed in a fundamental way. Those stories became a part of the work and the work became a part of that continuing survival story. The cultural context becomes both the inspiration and the beneficiary of the work. This work couldn’t happen in a one-way, positivist flow of architectural design. To try that would be to fail before even starting.6 To insure the project’s success the community needed to participate in the conception of the work at a fundamental level, and as professionals we needed to take them seriously. This is the reciprocal relationship that endures in this kind of work.

Major Accomplishments/Significance of Accomplishments

The Architecture Department’s faculty evaluation plan, in the section entitled “Evaluation of Scholarly/Creative/Professional Work” lists three areas as indices of performance: External Funding, Publications, and Awards. In the projects I have pursued as an engaged scholar, I have consistently been able to establish relationships with community partners that result in external funding for the construction of the work; I have been able to secure external funding through blind-reviewed grant programs for projects; I have consistently disseminated the work in peer-reviewed conference proceedings, academic journals and book chapters; and I have received numerous peer-reviewed design awards for the work attesting to its quality according to professional standards.

Goals for Next Five Years

In the past few years, I, along with some colleagues, have found a set of community partners based in Kansas City, Kansas working on issues of public health as they relate to the built environment. We were invited to establish a presence in the city and provide design assistance on a continuing basis. About 18 months ago, we established Dotte Agency, a community design hub “connecting communities and tackling problems through design.” We did so without any funding from KU, but with sweat equity, the generosity of our partners, and project funding that supports the mission of the work. In the next five years, I want to focus on making Dotte Agency a sustainable entity that continues to make an impact, improving the environment and health metrics of Wyandotte County. I also wish to provide mentoring for other engaged academics in the university who want to pursue engaged scholarship as their career path.

1. Ernest Boyer, Scholarship Reconsidered: Priorities of the Professoriate. (Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching. 1990) p. xiii.

2. Weerts, D J, and L R Sandmann. “Building a Two-Way Street: Challenges and Opportunities for Community Engagement at Research Universities.” The Review of Higher Education 32, no. 1 (2008): 73-106. and Kellogg Commission On The Future Of State And Land-Grant Universities (1999). Returning to our roots: The engaged institution (Vol. 3). National Association of State Universities and Land-Grant Colleges, Office of Public Affairs.

3. Boyer, p. 16.

4. Boyer, p.23.

5. Driscoll, Amy. “Carnegie’s New Community Engagement Classification: Affirming Higher Education’s Role in Community.” New Directions for Higher Education 2009, no. 147 (2009)

6. See, for example, projects like Pruitt Igoe, the catastrophic social housing project in St. Louis. Pruitt Igoe is the poster child for the failure of architects and planners to truly understand the needs and circumstances of disadvantaged housing tenants. It was demolished less than twenty years after its construction.

Research Interests

  • Design build
  • Design/build
  • Design-build
  • Engaged scholarship, community engagement
  • Public interest design
  • Design

Selected Publications

Shannon, C., & Nils, G. (in press). Mobilizing for Better Health through Prototyping Park Infrastructure. In Proceedings for Building for Health and Well-Being Conference.

Criss, S., & Gore, N. (in press). Taking “Engagement” Seriously: Mobilizing Community for Better Parks and Public Health . In Proceedings for the Architecture of Social Engagement Conference.

Gore, N., & Criss, S. (in press). Embracing Uncertainty:  Community Designbuild. In C. Kraus (Ed.), Designbuild Education in North America.

Johnson, B., & Gore, N. (2016). What do the Professions “Profess”? Comparing Architecture and Planning Codes of Ethics.

Kraus, C., & Gore, N. (2016). Educating for an Embodied Culture of Building. In Proceedings from the 104th ACSA Annual Meeting.

Criss, S., & Gore, N. (2014). Architecture as Acupuncture. Public, 2(2). http://public.imaginingamerica.org/blog/article/architecture-as-acupuncture/

Gore, N. (2014). Live Projects at Mid-Century: A Pre-History. In H. Harriss & L. Widder (Eds.), Architecture Live Projects: Pedagogy Into Practice. Routledge.

Mayo, J., & Gore, N. (2013). Confronting The Terrain Of Politics In Architectural Practice: Assessing Strengths And Weaknesses. Journal of Architectural and Planning Research, 30(3), 244-253.

Gore, N. (2013). Designing Better Portable Classrooms. In Proceedings of the 2012 Fall Association of Collegiate Schools of Architecture (ACSA) Conference.

Corser, R., & Gore, N. (2009). Insurgent Architecture: An Alternative Approach to Design-Build. Journal of Architectural Education, 62(4), 32-39.

Gore, N., & Corser, R. (2008). Long Distance Design-Build: Learning from the Challenges of Helping to Rebuild a Sustainable Community in New Orleans’ 7th Ward. In Proceedings from the 96th Annual Meeting of the Association of Collegiate Schools of Architecture.

Gore, N., & Corser, R. (2008). Insurgent Architecture in the Seventh Ward. Batture: Amnesiascope, 4, 4-11.

Gore, N., & Corser, R. (2008). Rebuilding the Seventh Ward’s Cultural Life. Cityscape: A Journal of Policy Development and Research (HUD), 10(3), 159-165.

Corser, R., & Gore, N. (2007). Participatory Design 7th Ward Building Arts Gallery: A New Model for Community Design/Build Projects [Abstract]. In EDRA 38 Building Sustainable Communities (pp. 227-228). Environmental Design Research Association.

Gore, N. (2006). A Pedagogical Strategy for Designing and Building Architecture. In Proceedings of the National Conference on the Beginning Design Student.

Gore, N. (2006). Mapping Context: Imagining a Future for the Boulevard Neighborhood. Review: Urban Planning & Architecture, 8(76), 7.

Gore, N. (2004). Craft and Innovation: Serious Play and the Direct Experience of the Real. Journal of Architectural Education, 58(1), 39-45.

Gore, N., Criss, S., Simon, M., & Shapiro, M. (2003). The Design Studio and the City: a Roundtable Discussion. Review: Urban Planning & Architecture, 5(6), 16-20.

Gore, N. (2002). Bridging the Gap between Design and Technology. In Proceedings from the 2002 ACSA Technology Conference (pp. 220-226).

Gore, N., & Criss, S. (2002). Okolona Downtown Park: A Collaborative Design-Build Project by Third Year Architecture Students. In Proceedings from the 90th Annual Meeting of the Association of Collegiate Schools of Architecture (ACSA) (pp. 253-256).

Gore, N. (2002). Okolona Downtown Park: Making Architecture Relevant to its Place. In Proceedings from the Constructing Place Conference, Bishop Auckland, England.

Gore, N., & Campbell, L. (2000). Conceptualizing Complexity: Using Digital Movies to Understand the Relationship between Structural and Construction Systems. In Emerging Technologies and Design: The Intersection of Design and Technology, Proceedings of the 2000 ACSA Technology Conference (pp. 208-212).

Gore, N., & Hagerman, J. (2000). Shallowing the Learning Curve: Making GIS Easy Enough for Even an Architect to Understand. In Proceedings from the Environmental Systems Research Inc. (ESRI) Users Conference.

Gore, N. (2000). Unexpected Gifts. Mississippi Folklife, 32(1), 14-18.

Gore, N. (1996). Architecture and its Photographic Image. In Proceedings from the 84th ACSA Annual Meeting and Technology Conference (pp. 489-493).

Gore, N. (1995). A Home for the Motorhome. In Proceedings from the 83rd ACSA Annual Meeting and Technology Conference.

Gore, N. (1994). Architecture and its Photographic Image. In Proceedings from the ACSA Southeast Regional Conference.

Selected Work

Our Hippie Modernism, KU Chalmers Hall Gallery, Lawrence, KS, USA. 2016 - 2016

Selected Presentations

Gore, N., Criss, S. & Kleinmann, M. (02/11/2017 - 02/11/2017). Who's at the Table?: Using the Design Process to Build a Health Community and Civic Pride Together. 5th Annual Community Development Workshop. Kaufmann Foundation, Kansas City, MO

Shannon, C. & Nils, G. (10/21/2016 - 10/21/2016). Taking “Engagement” Seriously: Mobilizing Community for Better Parks and Public Health . Scholarship of Social Engagement Symposium. Lawrence, KS

Shannon, C. & Nils, G. (09/23/2016 - 09/23/2016). Mobilizing for Better Health through Prototyping Park Infrastructure. Building for Health and Well-being. Honolulu. Available Here

Criss, S., Gore, N. & Marion, W. (10/09/2014). Going Mobile. Imagining America National Conference. Atlanta, GA

Gore, N. (06/30/2014). Evolving an Extra-curricular Pedagogy for Student Leadership in Public Interest Design. Emergence 2014: Association for Community Design. Detroit, MI

Criss, S. & Gore, N. (06/06/2014). Public Interest Design at University of Kansas. Design Futures Public Interest Design Student Leadership Forum. New Orleans, LA

Gore, N., Criss, S. & Taylor, E. (12/31/2013). Working Locally. Presentation and panelist, Public Interest Design Student Leadership Forum. Austin, TX

Gore, N., Criss, S., Bowne, L., MacNamara, S. & Luce, B. (10/04/2013). Performative Infrastructures. Imagining America National Conference. Syracuse, NY

Gore, N. (09/26/2013). Serious Play. Invited Lecture for School Lecture Series at Marywood University. Scranton, PA. Available Here

Gore, N. (12/31/2012). Designing Better Portable Classrooms. Presentation, ACSA Fall Conference. Philadelphia, PA

Gore, N. (12/31/2011). Long Distance Design-Build. Presentation, Leadership by Design Summit. Kansas City, MO

Gore, N. & Criss, S. (12/31/2010). Community Activism Through the Design Studio. Presentation, Urban Habitat Chicago. Chicago, IL

Gore, N. (12/31/2010). Perfectly Crooked: the Aesthetic Consequences of Irregularity. Presentation, KU Spencer Museum of Art. Lawrence, KS

Gore, N. (12/31/2009). Rebuilding the Seventh. Presentation, AIAKS 2009 conference & exhibition. Overland Park, KS

Gore, N. (12/31/2009). Rebuilding the Seventh. Presentation, Flint Hills Chapter, Construction Specifications Institute Annual Conference. Lawrence, KS

Gore, N. & Corser, R. (12/31/2008). Presentation and panelist, Rebuilding After Katrina - Creating New Benchmarks in Planning and Design. New Orleans, LA

Gore, N. & Corser, R. (12/31/2007). Education. Panelist, Structures for Inclusion. Charlotte, NC

Gore, N. (12/31/2006). A Pedagogical Strategy for Designing and Building Architecture. Paper, ACSA Annual meeting. Salt Lake City, UT

Gore, N. (12/31/2006). Design/Build in the Academy. Panelist, ACSA Annual meeting. Salt Lake City, UT

Gore, N. (12/31/2005). A Pedagogical Strategy for Designing and Building Architecture. Paper, National Conference on the Beginning Design Student. San Antonio, TX

Gore, N. (12/31/2002). Bridging the Gap between Design and Technology. Paper, ACSA Technology Conference. Portland, OR

Gore, N. (12/31/2002). Okolona Downtown Park: Making Architecture Relevant to its Place. Paper, Constructing Place Conference. Bishop Auckland, England

Gore, N. & Hagerman, J. (12/31/2000). Shallowing the Learning Curve: Making GIS Easy Enough for Even an Architect to Understand. Paper, Environmental Systems Research Inc. (ESRIESRI) Users Conference. San Diego, CA

Gore, N. (12/31/1996). Architecture and its Photographic Image. Paper, ACSA Annual Meeting. Boston, MA

Gore, N. (12/31/1995). A Home for the Motorhome. Design project, ACSA Annual Meeting. Seattle, WA

Selected Grants

Gore, Nils, (Co-Principal), Criss, Shannon, (Co-Principal), Developing a Mobile Bike Kitchen Prototype for Cooking Demonstrations, Centers for Disease Control 1422 Grant (through Community Health Council of Wyandotte County), $5,000, Submitted 06/01/2016 (07/01/2016 . Federal. Status: Funded.

Gore, Nils, (Co-Principal), Criss, Shannon, (Co-Principal), Developing Park Signage Prototypes to Promote Walkability in Wyandotte County, Centers for Disease Control 1422 Grant (through Community Health Council of Wyandotte County), $7,500, Submitted 06/01/2016 (07/01/2016 . Federal. Status: Funded.

Criss, Shannon, (Principal), Gore, Nils, (Co-Investigator), Mobilizing the Dottes for Better Health through Design, Health Care Foundation of Greater Kansas City, $131,000, Submitted 02/01/2017 (08/01/2017 - 06/30/2019) . Foundation. Status: Proposal Submitted.

Criss, Shannon, (Principal), Gore, Nils, (Co-Investigator), Kleinmann, Matt, (Co-Investigator), Fabrication of Mobile Market (Phase 2), Menorah Heritage Foundation, $20,000, Submitted 01/01/2017 (07/01/2017 - 06/30/2018) . Foundation. Status: Proposal Submitted.

Criss, Shannon, (Principal), Gore, Nils, (Co-Investigator), Connecting the Dottes: Finding and Building Intersections Between Access to Healthy Food & Walkable Neighborhoods, Health Care Foundation of Greater Kansas City, $89,472, Submitted 02/01/2016 (08/01/2016 - 06/30/2017) . Foundation. Status: Funded.

Gore, Nils, (Principal), Developing Bike Rack Prototypes for Wyandotte County, Us Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (through Community Health Council of Wyandotte County), $1,500, Submitted 06/01/2016 (07/01/2016 - 06/30/2017) . Federal. Status: Funded.

Gore, Nils, Developing a Mobile Natural History Museum, $6,000, Submitted 09/01/2016 (01/01/2017 - 05/31/2017) . University (KU or KUMC). Status: Funded.

Gore, Nils, (Principal), Developing Trail Mile Marker Prototypes to Promote Physical Activity in KCK, Centers for Disease Control 1422 Grant (through Community Health Council of Wyandotte County), $2,000, (09/20/2015 - 05/31/2017) . Federal. Status: Funded.

Gore, Nils, (Principal), Splitlog Farm Garden Shed/Community Classroom, Community Housing of Wyandotte County, $3,000, Submitted 01/01/2016 (01/01/2016 - 06/30/2016) . Not-for-Profit (not Foundation). Status: Funded.

Criss, Shannon, (Principal), Gore, Nils, (Co-Investigator), Connecting the Dottes: Finding and Building Intersections Between Access to Healthy Food & Walkable Neighborhoods, Health Care Foundation of Greater Kansas City, $51,028, Submitted 02/01/2015 (08/01/2015 - 06/30/2016) . Foundation. Status: Funded.

Gore, Nils, (Co-Principal), Criss, Shannon, (Co-Principal), Kleinmann, Matt, (Co-Investigator), Mobile Infrastructure for Participatory Design Ethnography, Hall Center for the Humanities (Scholars on Site), $9,950, Submitted 03/13/2015 (05/01/2015 - 05/31/2016) . Federal. Status: Funded.

Gore, Nils, (Principal), Developing Fitness Station Prototypes for Jersey Creek Park, Centers for Disease Control, PA-REACH grant program, $14,000, (01/01/2015 - 05/31/2016) . We developed 5 fitness station prototypes and installed them in Jersey Creek Park for evaluation in spring 2016. Federal. Status: Funded.

Criss, Shannon, (Principal), Gore, Nils, (Co-Investigator), Connecting the Dottes through Project-Based Prototyping, Wyandotte Health Foundation, $25,000, Submitted 05/01/2015 (09/01/2015 - 12/31/2015) . Foundation. Status: Funded.

Gore, Nils, (Principal), Armourdale Levee Trailhead, Healthy Communities Wyandotte, $3,000, (08/01/2015 - 12/31/2015) . This project is intended to provide a trailhead and trail amenities for a newly-developed bike/walk trail on top of the Kaw River levee in the Armourdale neighborhood of Kansas City, KS. It consists of directional signage elements that announce the location of the trailhead and an information kiosk sharing educational information about the trail itself. Local Government. Status: Funded.

Gore, Nils, (Principal), Epic Park Stage and Performance Space, Community Housing of Wyandotte County, Inc., $4,000, (01/01/2015 - 05/15/2015) . This project was intended to support enhanced public life in Kansas City, KS through development of a performance space for public arts events in conjunction with Epic Arts Studio. Using community engagement exercises, the arch409 design studio developed the design, then constructed and installed it in May 2015. It consists of an accessible stage enhanced by the inclusion of a set of musical stairs that strike steel chimes as one walks up the steps. Not-for-Profit (not Foundation). Status: Funded.

Gore, Nils, (Principal), Splitlog Greenhouse Installation and Enhancement, Community Housing of Wyandotte County, Inc., $1,000, (01/01/2015 - 05/15/2015) . This project installed a pre-fabricated, flat-packed greenhouse "kit" at Splitlog Farm in Kansas City, KS. IN addition to the installation we developed a rainwater collection system to demonstrate to schoolchildren the importance of water conservation. The rainwater storage system acts as thermal mass to enhance the performance of the greenhouse when starting plants in early spring. Not-for-Profit (not Foundation). Status: Funded.

Gore, Nils, (Co-Principal), Criss, Shannon, (Co-Principal), KUMobile Collaboratory, funded by a KU Strategic Initiative Grant, University of Kansas Center for Research, Inc., $31,000, (08/15/2013 - 01/31/2015) . University (KU or KUMC). Status: Funded.

Gore, Nils, East Hills Building Studio Furniture, University of Kansas School of Architecture, Design and Planning, $15,000, (01/01/2010 - 12/31/2010) . University (KU or KUMC). Status: Funded.

Gore, Nils, Rockefeller Prairie Trailhead Structure, Lawrence, KS, Kansas Biological Survey, $17,500, (01/01/2008 - 12/31/2008) . University (KU or KUMC). Status: Funded.

Gore, Nils, Rockefeller Prairie/Kaw River Overlook, Lawrence, KS, Kansas Biological Survey, $15,000, (01/01/2008 - 12/31/2008) . University (KU or KUMC). Status: Funded.

Gore, Nils, Multiple Projects in New Orleans’s Seventh Ward, New Orleans, LA, $35,000, (01/01/2006 - 12/31/2008) . Other. Status: Funded.

Gore, Nils, West Junior High School Courtyard Renovation, Lawrence, Kansas, Junior High School students and USD497, $10,000, (01/01/2005 - 12/31/2005) . Local Government. Status: Funded.

Gore, Nils, (Principal), Developing Flyash for New Architectural Uses, University of Kansas General Research Fund, $2,077, (01/01/2004 - 12/31/2004) . University (KU or KUMC). Status: Funded.

Gore, Nils, Snow Hall 210 Renovation, University of Kansas School of Architecture and Urban Design, $10,000, (01/01/2004 - 12/31/2004) . University (KU or KUMC). Status: Funded.

Gore, Nils, Optimizing Flyash for New Architectural Uses, University of Kansas, $9,089, (01/01/2003 - 12/31/2003) . University (KU or KUMC). Status: Funded.

Gore, Nils, Ryan Gray Community Playground Lighting, Lawrence, Kansas, Three Lawrence neighborhood associations, $6,800, (01/01/2003 - 12/31/2003) . Other. Status: Funded.

Gore, Nils, Introduction to Workshop Processes and Safety Procedures in the School of Architecture and Urban Design, Quest for the Best, Instructional Development and Support, University of Kansas, $5,000, (01/01/2002 - 12/31/2002) . University (KU or KUMC). Status: Funded.

Gore, Nils, (Principal), Increasing Technical Proficiency Through Understanding of Materiality and Construction, Schillig Teaching Grant, Mississippi State University, $2,227, - 12/31/2000) . Other University. Status: Funded.

Gore, Nils, Shallowing the Learning Curve, Mississippi State University, $10,000, - 12/31/2000) . University (KU or KUMC). Status: Funded.

Gore, Nils, Understanding the Pedagogy of Designing AND Building Architecture, Humanities and Arts Grant, Mississippi State University, $5,000, - 12/31/2000) . Other University. Status: Funded.

Gore, Nils, Okolona Downtown Park, Okolona, Mississippi, $24,000, - 12/31/1999) . Other. Status: Funded.

Gore, Nils, (Project Director), Criss, Shannon, (Principal), The Mississippi Electronic Almanac, The Small Town Center, MSU, Appalachian Regional Commission, $87,000, - 12/31/1998) . Other. Status: Funded.


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